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Thomas McAdory Owen's Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

 

CADENHEAD, JAMES, Sen., aged 98, resided in Pike County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

CAFFEY, JOHN, The Alabama Journal, Montgomery, August 28, 1826, contains the obituary of John Caffey: "Died, at his plantation, in the vicinity of Montgomery, on Saturday, the 19th, inst. (Aug. 19, 1826), of bilious fever, Mr. John Caffey, in seventy-fifth year of his age.

 

 "Mr. Caffey was born on the eastern shore of Maryland. At an early period of the revolution he enlisted under the command of Washington and La Fayette. After the struggle for independence was over he settled in Guilford County, N.C., where he had the confidence of his fellow citizens. He moved to this town in 1817 and was esteemed for his peaceful and neighborly conduct. Mr. Caffey had long been an exemplary member of the church, and when sensible his last moments were approaching, he surrendered his spirit with praises of God on his lips and an entire possession of his understanding."
 He was the son of Michael Caffey of North Ireland, who migrated to New Jersey early in the 18th century. His wife was Mary Buchanan of Virginia. Mr. William Hardwick Ruth, a great-great-grandson now (1910) resides in Montgomery.
 
 His remains lie in an old family burying ground on the Woodley road, near the city of Montgomery. He was the friend of Lafayette, and when that distinguished patriot visited Montgomery in 1825, one of the old veterans to greet him was John Caffey.—See Blue's Montgomery Directory, 1878; and Archives of Maryland, Vol. 18, p. 27 and 643.

 

CALDWELL, DAVID, aged 87, resided in Talladega County, June 1, 1840, with Charles Caldwell. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CALDWELL, JAMES. Mrs. P.H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, vol. iv, pp. 534-5, says:

 

 "James Caldwell is buried in the cemetery at old Davisville, in Calhoun County, Ala, one and one-half miles south of Iron City station, twelve miles east of Anniston, on the Southern railroad. The 'oldest inhabitant' could give no information concerning the soldier.

 "The tomb is built of brick; about 8 feet long, 61/2 feet wide, and 5 feet high. The shingles of the roofs are badly rotted. A plain marble tablet is let into the wall of the tomb, bearing this inscription:

 

Sacred to the memory of JAMES CALDWELL, who died October 2nd, 1847; in the 98th year of his age. He was a soldier of the Revolution. "The above account was furnished by W. B. Bowling, of Lafayette, Ala.

 

 "Efforts have been made in vain to find the history of this old soldier. It is said that he came from South Carolina. He is another one of those forgotten heroes whose graves are scattered over the State."

 

 

CALHOUN, JOSEPH. A good old age. The Savannah papers publish a notice of the death of a veteran soldier of the Revolution. Joseph Calhoun, at the advanced age of one hundred years and ten months. He fought in several of the most important battles of the war of Independence—at Camden, Guilford Courthouse, and Yorktown. Mr. Calhoun died at his residence in Dooly County, Georgia. By nativity he was a North Carolinian. The Dispatch, Wetumpka, Dec. 5, 1856.

 

CAMPBELL, CHARLES, aged 76, and a resident of Lauderdale County; private, Virginia State Troops; enrolled on October 7, 1833 under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CAMPBELL, DAVID, aged 72, and a resident of Greene County; private, S.C. Militia; enrolled on September 17. 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30; sums received to date of publication of list, $90. — Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Greene County, June 1, 1840, aged 80. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

CAMPBELL, GEORGE, a resident of Autauga County; private and sergeant, particular service not shown; enrolled on April 8, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $55.83.—Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

CAMPBELL, WILLIAM, Name appears on Huntsville Monument, erected by Twickenham Town Chapter, D.A.R.

 

CAMFIELD, CAPT. AARON "On motion of Richard Camfield of Shelby County, Tenn., whose deposition taken before Judge of the Court of Marion County, Alabama, on the 3 Feb. 1834 is produced in Court, ORDERED: certified to the Register of the State Land Office in Virginia that the Court is satisfied that the late Capt. Aaron Camfield, an officer in the Continental Line of Virginia, shortly after the war of the Revolution, removed from Virginia to Hancock County, Ga., and married, that he died two or three years after his marriage, leaving a widow and only son; that his widow survived him but a short time, and both died intestate and that the aforesaid Richard Camfield is the son and only surviving heir-at-law of said Capt. Aaron Camfield, Hanover County, Va., Order Book 1831-1835, p. 158, Court 28 Nov. 1832." Ljungstedt County Court Note Book, April, 1927, p. 15.

 

CARD, HUGH, aged 84, resided in Randolph, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CARGILL, THOMAS, age not given, a resident of Jackson County; private of Cavalry, N.C. Militia; enrolled on January 6, 1834; under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $100; sums received to date of publication of list, $300.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Marshall County, June 1, 1840, aged 77. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CARLETON, JOSEPH Grave located.—General D.A.R. Report, 1929.

 

CARLETON, JOSEPH, born October l, 1763, married December 25, 1787, Elizabeth Eddins, born November 9, 1771. He was the son of William Carleton, of Botetourt County, Va. It is supposed that he enlisted at the age of sixteen. He died in St. Clair County, Ala., and is buried in an old cemetery, N.W., Attalla, Etowah County. Information from biographical files, Alabama Department of Archives and History.

 

CARROL, DUMPSEY, aged 82, and a resident of Wilcox County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on July 25, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CARROLL, DEMPSEY, aged 78, resided in Wilcox County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. (Probably same as preceding, but age of each makes it uncertain.)

 

CARROLL, DENNIS Shelby County census of 1820 gives one male and one female over twenty-one. The Census of 1820 gives "Daniel" with one male and one female between sixty and seventy. Denis Carroll of Shelby County on the list of pensions rejected.

 

CARUTHERS, HUGH, aged 77, and a resident of Madison County; private, N.C. Continental Line; enrolled on December 31, 1832, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CASEY, WILLIAM, aged 77, and a resident of Autauga County; private, S.C. Militia; enrolled on March 7, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Coosa County, June 1, 1840, with M. B. Casey, aged 89. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

CATCHUM, HUGH, aged 72, and a resident of Limestone County; private, N.C. Militia and State Troops; enrolled on January 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $46.66; sums received to date of publication of list, $139.98. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CAULK, JACOB, aged 85, resided in Madison County, June 1, 1840, with John H. Webster. Census of Pensioners, 184l, p. 148.

 

CAVETT, RICHARD an old and respectable citizen of this county, died at his residence on the 11th inst., aged 80 years and 5 months. His health had been declining for many years, and his departure from this world was anticipated by him with resignation and composure. He was a soldier of the Revolution and also of the late war; and had given frequent proofs of his devotion to this country. He was long an acceptable member of the Baptist Church and died in the faith of a happy change of existence. He was an industrious and enterprising citizen, and has realized by his own exertions an independent fortune. He has left a number of descendants and connexions to lament his loss.—Huntsville. The Democrat, November 27, 1844. See Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, Vol. 4.

 

CAVETT, RUTH. Died in this county, on the 5th inst., in the 77th year of her age, Mrs. Ruth Cavett, wife of the venerable Richard Cavett, a patriot of the Revolution. Mrs. Cavett was for 54 years a professor of religion, and for the past 20 years attached to the Baptist Church. She was the mother of eleven children, who with their offspring, deeply lament the death of one whom they so much loved indeed, her loss is greatly lamented by her neighbors and all who knew her, and doubly so by the partner of her bosom.—Huntsville, The Democrat, December 14, 1843.

 

CHALKER, Mrs. REBECCA, of Crottenden's Mills. Real Daughter.—D.A.R. Report, 1908-09, p. 33.

 

CHANCELLER, DAVID—The undersigned served in the revolutionary war, in the Virginia line in the month of February, 1777, in Captain Holdman Rice's company, to guard the troops of Gen. Burgoyne, who were then prisoners of war. He was in said company about eight months, when he was transferred to Capt. Merriwether's company, where he served 15 months—Col. Francis Taylor commanded the Regiment while he was in the service, he was honorably discharged on the 2nd of May, 1779. He was also at the seige of Yorktown. If there is any person still who can prove his service, he hopes that they will give information. Mr. Wm. Roundtree, and Mr. Daniel Kneaves, who a few years ago lived in Mercer County, Ken. were in the same company with him; but he cannot learn where they have removed to. From his age and his helpless situation, he needs the assistance of his country. Information will be communicated to Col. Steven F. Ogden, Yellow Banks, Davies County, on this business. David Chanceller August 15, 1825. The Tuscumbian, August 22, 1825.

 

CHANCELLOR, JERRY. "This soldier of the Revolution is buried in a country churchyard at Pine Level Methodist church, in Autauga County, eighteen miles west of Montgomery.

 

 "A short sketch of the life of Jerry Chancellor may be found in the Memorial Record of Alabama, vol. ii., p. 895. He was born in England and came to America with his father and two brothers, when sixteen years of age. This was during the Revolutionary War. After remaining a short time in Virginia, the father and his two oldest sons, William and Jerry, came to South Carolina, leaving the youngest son, Jackson Chancellor, in Virginia. Tradition says that Chancellorsville, Virginia, was named for the family of this youngest son.
 "When the Chancellors arrived in South Carolina they found the war raging violently all around them and it became necessary for them to decide what their own course should he. The father, whose loyalty to England could not be shaken, told his sons that he should join the British; the sons declared that they admired the Americans for standing up for their rights and they intended to cast their lots with the people of their adopted country. The father and sons never met again, but fought on opposite sides until the close of the Revolutionary War. We do not know in what regiment Jerry Chancellor served, but Saffell's Records, p. 293, states that Nov. 1, 1779, William Chancellor was a private in the South Carolina regiment commanded by Lieut. Col. Francis Marion, Seventh Company, Thomas Dunbar, captain.
 "Jerry Chancellor married Galatea Gilbert and settled in South Carolina after the Revolution, where he remained until 1818, when he organized a colony in South Carolina and came with them to Alabama. They settled on the Autauga side of the Alabama River. He remained with this colony until his death. Descendants of Jerry Chancellor are now living in Childersburg and in Coosa County. His grandson, William S. Chancellor was one of the oldest Masons in Alabama.--Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol . iv ., P . 535.

 

CHANDLER, JOHN, aged 89, resided in Benton County, June 1, l840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CHENEY, Mrs. AUGUSTA BELLINGER, of Montgomery. Real daughter. D.A.R. Report, 1908-09, p. 33.

 

CHERRY, JOSIAH, aged 79, resided in Marengo County, June 1, 1840, with J. W. Cherry. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

CHRISTIAN, GEORGE (1762-1831) served as private in Capt. Holman Rice's company of Foot, Col. Francis Taylor's regiment of guards, Virginia. He was born in Goochland County, Va.; died in Wilcox County, Ala. D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 139, page 131.

 

CHRISTOPHER, Mrs. MARY MALISSA FAVER, of Strange. Real daughter.--D.A.R. Report 1908-09, p.33.

 

CLARKE, LEWIS, aged 71, and a resident of Jackson County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on November 4, 1833, under the act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840, aged 77. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CLARK, ROBERT. Departed this life at his residence in Madison County, Ala., on Monday morning November 20, 1837, Mr. Robert Clark. He was born in Halifax County, N.C., on the 23rd of February, 1756; he had for the last twenty odd years been a resident of this county; he had for a long time been a man of affliction, and for the last, two weeks of his life he was confined by exceeding painful affliction. Yet amidst all he neither murmured nor repined, but sustained it with patience, fortitude and resignation. He was an upright citizen, a kind neighbor and affectionate parent, and fulfilled the duties of life with correctness and fidelity; kind and mourning friends ministered to the hours of illness, and watched around his dying couch, but all availed not to avert the fatal stroke. The hour of departure had arrived—the summons of Him who gave life had recalled the vital spark, and the soul went home to the bosom of its Father and God. Bereaved relatives and sorrowing friends may weep their loss, but their hours of mourning are brightened by the glorious hope of a joyous resurrection, and a full belief of a happy meeting in that better world where all is peace, where sorrow is unknown and happiness without alloy prevails forever. Sacred be the memory of the dead—long will the memory of his worth be cherished and the remembrance of his virtues remain to cheer and comfort the appointed years of those who remain sojourners and pilgrims in this vale of tears. Huntsville, The Democrat, Nov. 25, 1837.

 

CLARK, THOMAS, aged 79, and a resident of Tuscaloosa County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on September 26, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $60; sums received to date of publication of list, $180.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CLAY, WILLIAM , Esq., Revolutionary soldier. - On the 4th ult. at his residence in Gringer County, Tenn., William Clay, Esq., father of the Hon. C. C. Clay, Senator in Congress from Alabama. The deceased was born in the County of Chesterfield, in the State of Virginia on the 11th. of August, 1760. Consequently, when he died he was within one week of completing his 81st year. He entered the Revolutionary Army at the early age of sixteen, served several tours of duty with the militia of his native State, and aided in the closing scene of the War of Independence, by his services at the siege of Yorktown and the capture of Lord Cornwallis. After his marriage, he settled in the county of Halifax, Va., where he resided several years. He then removed to the western country, and settled in Tennessee, where he spent the last forty-five years of his life. He has left an aged widow and numerous descendants and relatives to mourn his loss. He died as he lived: an honest man and a patriot. Huntsville Democrat, September 4, 1841.

 

CLEMENT, THOMAS (1752-1823) enlisted, 1776, as private in Captain William Caldwell's company, Colonel William Thompson's 3rd South Carolina regiment. He was wounded at the Battle of Eutaw Springs. He was born in South Carolina; died in Alabama. D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 155, p. 206.

 

CLEMENTS, CULLIVER. The paternal grandfather of Dr. B. F. Wilson, also came from Tennessee to Tuscaloosa with his son William, in 1818, and there died, over thirty years ago. His maternal grandfather, Culliver Clements, came from Georgia to Tuscaloosa, in 1818, and to Pickens County the next year, settled the place where now lives John L. Guyton, and subsequently removed to the present residence of Dudly Pruitt, where he died in 1840. Jesse Clements was his son. Both these ancestors were soldiers of the Revolution—Wilson was at Guilford Courthouse battle; Clements was a South Carolina partisan soldier, in the trying times of Marion and his whig comrades. The descent is said to be Scotch-Irish on both sides. Smith, History of Pickens County, pp. 241-42.

 

CLEVELAND, COL. LARKIN. The grave of Mrs. Larkin Cleveland, wife of Col. Larkin Cleveland, of the Revolution, is at the old Govan graveyard about eight miles south of Selma, and the inscription is as follows: This marble placed here by C. H. Cleveland, son. In memory of his mother Mrs. Frances Cleveland, Widow of Col. Larkin Cleveland, sen. She was born August 6th, 1756 and died March 26th, 1836. This C. H. Cleveland was Carter Harrison Cleveland.—Mrs. R. L. Sturdivant, Berlin, Alabama.

 

CLICK, JOHN, resided in Jefferson County, on the East side of Valley Creek, between the present Powderly and old Hawkins Big Spring. Here he built a mill, which later became the property of his son, Moss Click.

 

CLOWER, JONATHAN, aged 71, and a resident of Bibb County; private, N. Carolina Militia; enrolled on July 6, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COCHRAN, WILLIAM, age not given, a resident of Clarke County; sergeant, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on September 22, 1819, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from September 7, 1818; annual allowance, $96.; sums received to date of publication of list, $1 21.60; died December 12, 1819.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COLEMAN, CHARLES P., aged 71, and a resident of Greene County; private, N.C. State Troops; enrolled on October 3, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COLEMAN, FRANCIS, (1744-1823) served as a private in the Georgia troops. He was born in Virginia; died in Washington County, Ala. D.A.R. Lineage Book, vol. 163, page 121. See also McCall's Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia, page 210.

 

COLLIER, JAMES. Died at his residence near the village, on Monday the 20th instant, after a severe illness of two weeks, Mr. James Collier, in the 77th year of his age. Mr. Collier was a native of Virginia, and at an early period of his life entered the Revolutionary Army. Through the whole of that arduous and protracted struggle for liberty, he manifested the most untiring zeal and unceasing devotion in the cause of his country. He was no less distinguished for his patriotism, than for high-toned honor and those bland and social virtues which endeared him to a large circle of relations and friends.

 

 Overwhelming as is this melancholy bereavement to his worthy family, in which he shone as a most affectionate husband and father, and benevolent master, there is still for them great consolation in knowing that he developed strong hopes of future bliss, that flourish above the tomb, immortal and unfading. Many of his latest moments were spent in prayer; and he maintained throughout this trying interval that propriety which belonged to the character of a man of sense, and that elevated dependence upon a higher power which became a Christian.

 

 Such were, as we have been enabled to sketch them, the life and death of our deceased friend; we see pictured in them the employments of a man bent earnestly and steadily upon the faithful discharge of the duties which pertained to the situation allotted to him by his Creator. No meritorious artifice to attract the popular applause, no disingenuous maneuvering, were perceptible in his character. These qualities rendered him firm and steady in his friendships. His loss will long be felt by the circle of relations whom he has left behind him; and his memory, as a soldier and a man, will be long and affectionately cherished by all to whom he was known.

 

 How often, at the peaceful fireside of this revolutionary soldier, have we heard the tale of the deeds of other years! Even now, can we see, in fancy's eye, the grey-haired sire, traveling with increased emotion through the memorable battles of Gilford, Brandywine, Savannah and Eutaw Springs. His aged and failing eyes glisten again with the fire of youth! At the recollection of their resplendent glories, he springs forward from the venerable chair of age, and in the warmth of emotion, almost forgets, for the time, the lapse of years! But he is gone to the cold and silent tomb, moldering into dust, and mingling again with his mother earth. No more shall his spirit rejoice in the cannon's roar, or the music of the drum. Triana, Madison Co., Ala. Aug. 18, 1832.—Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Sept. 8, 1832.

 

 Mrs. P. H. Mell has collected some additional details, and her sketch is given in full, although it contains some repetitions:

 

 "James Collier a Revolutionary soldier, is buried on his plantation near Triana, Madison County, Alabama, about twenty miles from Huntsville.

 

 "His wife is buried beside him and their monuments, with inscriptions, are now standing in a full state of preservation in the old family burying ground. The inscriptions are as follows:
" 'To the memory of JAMES COLLIER, who was born in Lunenburg Co. Va., Oct. 13th, A. D. 1757, and died the 20th of August, A. D. 1832. "And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: whom I shall see for myself and my eyes shall behold and not another." To the memory of ELIZABETH BOULDIN, of Charlotte Co., Va., wife of James Collier, who was born the 13th of Feb., A. D. 1763, and died the 23rd of Feb., A. D. 1828.

 

 "All flesh is grass, and all the goodliness thereof is as a flower of the field, for the wind passeth over it and it is gone and the place thereof shall know it no more."

 

 "James Collier was the son of Cornelius Collier and Elizabeth Wyatt, of Lunenburg County, Va. He was descended from Charles Collier, of King and Queen County, Va., on his father's side, and his mother was nearly related to Sir Francis Wyatt, Colonial Governor of Virginia. It was the old flax wheel of his (James Collier's) cousin, Mary Collier, the ancestor of the late Prof. G. Brown Goode, which suggested insignia of the Daughters of the American Revolution. James Collier was wounded at the battle of Eutaw Springs by a sabre cut across his cheek, in a hand-to-hand encounter with a British soldier. He killed the soldier and carried the scar on his face to his grave. His brother, Wyatt Collier, was killed in the same battle when only a boy.

 

 "James Collier married Elizabeth Bouldin, July 3, 1788, daughter of James Bouldin and Sally Watkins, of Charlotte County, Va. He was a large land owner in Lunenburg County and resided there until 1802, when he, with his little family, followed his father and other relatives to Abbeville District, South Carolina. He was a large planter in that State until 1818, when he followed his sons to the territory of Alabama, his older sons having settled in that part of the Mississippi territory, now Alabama, in 1812. He settled on a large plantation in Madison County, where he lived and died.

 

 "His wife, Elizabeth Bouldin, was the daughter of James Bouldin, who was the oldest son of Colonel Thomas Bouldin of Colonial fame, who settled in Lunenburg (now Charlotte) County, Virginia, in l 744, coming from Pennsylvania. His wife was Nancy Clark, niece of Captain Richard Wood of the English navy. The family of Bouldins are noted for their intellect and their love for the legal profession. Virginia boasts there has never been a generation without a Judge, even to the present day. This couple left a large family of sons, but there were only four grandsons among, the grandchildren. Governor Henry Watkins Collier was a son of James Collier. He was closely connected with the politics of Alabama from 1822 until his death in 1855.

 

 "The ancestry of James Collier is as follows:

 

 (1) Charles Collier of King and Queen County, Virginia. One of his children,-

 

 (2) John Collier, Sr., (1680-1735), who was married three times, by his third wife, Nancy Eyres, had issue, among others:

 

 (3) Cornelius Collier, born 1725, married Elizabeth Wyatt in Gloucester County, Va., about 1750, lived in Lunenburg County, Va., was a soldier in the Revolution and moved to Abbeville District, South Carolina in 1788; he had four sons and one of them was—

 

 (4) James Collier, the subject of this sketch. The facts of this article were furnished by his great-granddaughter Miss Elizabeth R. Benagh. James Collier is mentioned in the Memorial Record of Alabama, vol. ii p. 415."— Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 536-7.
 

 

COLLINS, ELISHA, aged 75, and a resident of Greene County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on December 18, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30; sums received to date of publication of list, $90. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COLLINS, MRS. ELIZABETH Died March 20, 1852, at the residence of her son, ALFRED COLLINS, in Limestone County, Mrs. ELIZABELTH COLLINS, relict to SOLOMON COLLINS, a Revolutionary soldier, aged about 88 years.—Huntsville, Southern Advocate, March 31, 1852.

 

COLLINS, WYATT—Resided at Burnt Corn in 1825, was invited to LaFayette Celebration at Clairbourne, April 6, 1825.— Alabama Military Archives.

 

COLLINS, ELY. aged 76, and a resident of Limestone County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on February 23, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40 ; sums received to date of publication of list, $100.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc, 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CONE, JESSE , Montgomery County. Name appears on tablet placed in hall of Alabama Memorial Building by Francis Marion Chapter, D.A.R., 1941.

 

CONNALLY, JOHN WILLIAM. Name appears on Huntsville Monument, erected by Twickenham Town Chapter, D.A.R.

 

COOK, BENJAMIN, aged 82, resided in Monroe County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

COOK, REUBEN, aged 74, and a resident of Fayette County; private N.C. Militia; enrolled on November 15, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March A, 1831; annual allowance, $36.66; sums received to date of publication of list, $109.98.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Fayette County, June 1, 1840, aged 80. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CORLEY, ZACCHEUS, aged 72, and a resident of Bibb County; private, S. Carolina Militia; enrolled on March 8, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $10; sums received to date of publication of list, $100.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. Xiii, Sen. Doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Bibb County, June 1, 1840, aged 77. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

CORY, THOMAS, age not given, a resident of Mobile County; sergeant, 4th Battalion Corps Artillery; enrolled on May 21, 1821, payment to date from February 15, 1821; annual allowance, $32; sums received to date of publication of list, $161.41; Acts Military establishment.—Revolutionary Pension Roll ill Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COSEY, JAMES- Mr. Cosey and the Messrs. Cluff located within the limits of the present village, (Evergreen) while Mr. Andrews pitched his tent upon the hill beyond the small branch, west of Evergreen. Mr. Cosey was an old Revolutionary soldier,and bore the mark of a severe wound in his bosom. Riley's History of Conecuh County, Alabama, p. 63.

 

COTTON, JAMES, aged 69, and a resident of Madison County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on March 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1833, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $55; sums received to date of publication of list, $165.--Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COUCH, ELY, age not given, a resident of Russell County; corporal 4th Regular U. S. Infantry; enrolled on September 20. 1832, payment to date from August 1 1832; annual allowance, $96 ; sums received to date of publication of list, $201.06; Acts Military establishment.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-31.

 

COURSON, JAMES, aged 72, and a resident of Montgomery County ; private, S.C. Continental Line and Militia; enrolled on January 19, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

COWLES, WILLIAM MARSTEN. At his residence in this county, on Friday the 15th inst., Major William Marsten Cowles, in the 70th year of his age. Thus passeth away the witnesses of, and the participators in, the scenes of the Revolution.

 

Major Cowles was a native of Charles City, Va., and although a very young man at that time, voluntarily put on the armour of his country, in defence of her violated rights. He was a member of a voluntary corps of cavalry, stationed at Charles City Court House; was taken prisoner at that place, carried to Westover and put on board an English ship of war, then lying off that place, where he was detained two months, when he made his escape, carrying off six other prisoners; he landed at Ferry Point, from whence he proceded to the Great Bridge, to the camp of General Gregory, reaching that place the day after the battle fought there; he thence returned home.

 

Shortly after this period, Lord Cornwallis was beseiged by the American forces under General Washington, at Little York. Major Cowles, in company with several gentlemen of his acquaintance, repaired to the scene of action, & was present at the surrender of that place. In 1784, he emigrated to the State of Georgia, and settled in the County of Richmond, near Augusta. For many years after the peace with Great Britain, the Creek Indians continued to be troublesome to the settlements on the frontiers of Georgia, and in an expedition ordered out by the State for their chastisement, Major COWLES volunteered his services, and during the expedition, served in the capacity of Aid, to Major General Twiggs. He continued to reside near Augusta until 1818, when he removed to this State, and located himself in this county, where, by his hospitality, and active benevolence, he has acquired a numerous circle of friends and acquaintances, who, with the more immediate members of his family, will long deplore his loss. Selma Courier, November 20, 1828.

 

COX, JOHN Listed in the Report of the Secretary of War of 1852 as living at Clarksville, Clarke County, as one whose application for a pension as a soldier of the Revolution had been rejected for the reason that the service had been of less than six months duration. The Clarke County census of 1830 lists him as aged between sixty and seventy. The census of l840 lists him as between seventy and eighty. His name does not appear in the census of 1850.

 

COZBY, ROBERT, age not given, a resident of Lowndes County; private Revolutionary Army; enrolled on May 15, 1821; payment to date from February 14, 1821; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $245.06; Acts Military establishment.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CRAFT, EZEKIEL, aged 72, and a resident of Madison County; private, dragoon and drummer, S.C. Continental Line and Militia; enrolled on December 3l, 1832, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, l831; annual allowance, $93.33; sums received to date of publication of list, $279.99.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-3-4. He resided in Madison County, June 1, l 840, aged 77. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CRAIG, JOHN, aged 71, and a resident of Limestone County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on January 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $28.34.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CRAIG, JOHN, aged 75, resided in Limestone County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, p. 148.

 

CRANE, MAYFILLD, aged 67, and a resident of Pickens County; private, S.C. State Troops; enrolled on April 13, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

CRENSHAW, STEPHEN A Revolutionary soldier, with a large family, stores and stock, etc., moved from Edgefield District, S.C., about 1817, to the Territory of Alabama. He entered the land known as Lowndes County, Hayneville, cutting the roads and bridges as they moved. He died in 1820 from exposure and was buried in the woods in Lowndes County. Afterwards a Methodist Church was built near his grave. Later others were buried there and was enclosed by brick wall and was kept by Susan Crenshaw Hardy and grandsons Dr. Henry L. Whipple, of Montgomery. During the War Between the States the graves were neglected and later were sold and a warehouse marks the place. It is at Hayneville, Dreighman's Warehouse. She remembers seeing part of his uniform, knee buckles, coat and pants. She saw these things at Hayneville. He was a private. Mrs. Hardy is 87 years old. Her mother's name was Baby Ruth Queen Victoria. Mrs. Hardy in 1927, was living with her daughter at Stone's Tank.

 

CROW, ROBERT , (1761-1850) served as private in Crockett's company, 7th Virginia regiment commanded by Col. Holt Richeson. He applied for a pension, 1819, and his claim was allowed. He was born in Fincastle County, Va.; died in DeKalb County, Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, vol.121, p. 160.

 

CULP, FREDERICK—Buried near Gurley or Huntsville, Ala., Madison County. Several letters in Library, Department of Archives and History, making this statement but no proof.

 

CUNNINGHAM, ROBERT, aged 73, and a resident of Tuscaloosa County; private and sergeant, N.C. Continental Line and Militia; enrolled on June 5, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1871; annual allowance, $91.67; sums received to date of publication of list, $275.01.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

 Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 537-541 has a full account of the life and services of this patriot.

 

 "Rev. Robert Cunningham lies buried near the central part of the old cemetery in Tuscaloosa. A stately marble shaft marks his grave; the epitaph which covers the four sides of the shaft is in Latin, showing among other things that he had been a soldier of the Revolution, and pastor of Presbyterian churches in Georgia and in Lexington, Kentucky.

 

 "These inscriptions are as follows:

 

 On the west face:

 

 Hic Sepultus Jacet Vir ille ROBERTUS M. CUNNINGHAM, D. D. Belli Revolutionis Americanae miles fidelis. etiamque Crucis Domini Jesu Christi:

 

On the east face:

 

Ecclesiae Presb. in Republica Georgiae Pastor Multos annos. Et in urbe Lexingtonia Rep. Kentuckiensis Eundem honorem tulit.

 

On the south face:

 

 Qui De Religione, de Patria Optime meritus: Maximo suorum et bonorum omnium Desiderio Mortem obiit, Die Jul. Xl: Anno Domini: MDCCCXXXIX: Aetatis suas LXXX.

 

On the north face:

 

 Uxor dilectissima Hoc monumentum ponendum Curavit. "The facts concerning the life of this distinguished man are mostly taken from Sanders' Early Settlers of Alabama, p. 197. The author says that the importance of historical societies is shown from the fact that very little information could be obtained for this biography from any source until he wrote to the Presbyterian Historical Society of Philadelphia, when he promptly received a circumstantial account of the events of his life.

 

 "Robert M. Cunningham, a son of Roger and Mary Cunningham, was born in York County, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1760. In 1775 his parents removed to North Carolina. Query 293 of the Historical and Genealogical Department of the Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser states that 'Roger Cunningham and wife, Sturgeon, removed from near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, just previous to the Revolutionary War. They had six children, Robert, William, James, Nelly, Mary and Margaret.' There is little room to doubt that this is the same family as that of the subject of this sketch, and that his mother's name was Mary Sturgeon.

 

 "Robert served as a youthful soldier in the North Carolina contingent during the Revolutionary War, but it is not known to what regiment he was attached. At the close of the war he went to school to the Rev. Robert Finley, Mr. Robert McCulloch and the Rev. Joseph Alexander. In 1787, being 26 years of age, he entered the junior class in Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., and graduated in 1789.

 

 "On leaving college he returned to his parents and taught school while he studied theology. He was licensed to preach by the First Presbytery of South Carolina in 1792. Here he married his first wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Mary Moore, of Spartanburg District. A sketch of the life of Charles Moore is given in J. B. Landrum's History of Spartanburg, p. 189. He was a brave and faithful old patriot. Elizabeth died November 3, 1794, leaving a daughter who died young.

 

 "In the autumn of 1792 he went to Georgia and organized a church called Ebenezer, in Hancock County; he also preached at Bethany Church. October 15, 1795, he married Betsy Ann, daughter of Joseph Parks, of Prince Edward County, Virginia, and by this marriage he had five sons, one of whom was the Rev. Joseph Cunningham, a minister of ability. October 14 1805, he married as a third wife, Emily, daughter of Col. William Bird, of Warren County, Georgia, originally from Pennsylvania, who survived him. Hers was a family of distinction.—See Dubose's Life of Yancey. Three of her aunts on her father's side married signers of the Declaration of Independence, James Wilson and George Ross, of Pennsylvania, and George Read, of Delaware. Her sister, Caroline Bird, married Benjamin Cudworth Yancey, and was the mother of the great Southern orator, William Lowndes Yancey. Another sister, Louisa Bird, married Captain Robert Cunningham of 'Rosemont,' South Carolina, a gentleman of great wealth, liberality and high culture, and an officer in the war of 1812. Their daughter, Miss Ann Pamela Cunningham, was the founder of the Mt. Vernon Ladies' Memorial Association and was its first regent. Another sister married Jesse Beene, of Cahaba, a distinguished lawyer and politician. A brother, Will E. Bird, was County judge of Dallas County, Alabama, 1836. It is a singular coincidence that Emily Bird married Rev. Robert Cunningham, of Georgia, and another sister, Louisa Bird, married Capt. Robert Cunningham, of South Carolina. Rev. Robert Cunningham at the time of his marriage must have won much distinction in a ministerial and social respect. By this last marriage he had a son, Robert, a physician who died in Sumter County, Alabama, and three daughters, Mrs. Maltby, Mrs. Wilson and Louisa.

 

 "In 1807 he removed to Lexington, Kentucky, and was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian church. This town was even then celebrated for its wealth and intellectual culture and this pulpit required a minister of learning and eloquence. He remained in Lexington until 1822, when he removed to Moulton, in North Alabama. He had been laboring as a minister for thirty years, and, requiring some relaxation, he bought a plantation but preached in Moulton and surrounding villages. In 1826 he bought a farm eleven miles from Tuscaloosa and removed there. He built up churches in Tuscaloosa and at Carthage; he also preached occasionally at Greensboro, where his son, Joseph, was pastor. For eight years he preached a free gospel at Tuscaloosa. He preached his last sermon in 1838. He received the degree of doctor of divinity from Franklin College, Georgia (now the University), in 1827. In 1836 he removed to Tuscaloosa, and he died there on the 1lth of July, 1839, 80 years of age. Dr. Cunningham was a man of impressive appearance; his height was more than six feet and his form was well developed; his features were good with expressive eyes; he was a man of learning, eloquence and power in preaching; a man of charity, beloved by Christians of all denominations, and his tenderness in preaching opened many hearts. The old saint was called in Alabama 'Father Cunningham'; and he is thus described in Nall's Dead of the Synod of Alabama : 'Very few men ever exhibited more of clear and sound intellect—of tender, melting pathos—and of bold and manly eloquence—than did this patriarch of the church.' "

 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM N., aged 93, resided in Benton County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

CURRY, THOMAS, sergeant, particular service not shown; annual allowance, $31.82; not demanded after March, 1831.—Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

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